Nutty Facts: Nut-size bits and pieces of useful information.
Peanuts: Don't call them nuts
When you consider that the average American consumes 12 pounds of peanuts a year, it’s safe to assume that peanuts are one of our favorite nuts. Or are they? Actually the peanut isn’t a nut at all, but a legume (the fruit or seed of leguminous plants), which means it grows underground like a potato and is related to peas and beans.

Nutty Facts:
Peanuts contain mostly beneficial mono-unsaturated and poly-unsaturated fats. These fats have been shown to help lower blood LDL-cholesterol levels.
One ounce, or a small handful of plain Dry Roasted Peanuts, contains 9% of your daily needed fiber (2.2 grams). Peanuts also contain 14 grams of fat per one ounce serving.
An ounce of plain dry roasted peanuts is a good source of folic acid, important for development of new cells in the body particularly during growth and pregnancy. The same serving also provides niacin (vitamin B3), and contains essential minerals, such as magnesium, phosphorus and manganese.

SOURCE:
  • USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 23 (2010), www.ars.usda.gov
  • American Peanut Council, www.peanutsusa.com
  • Nutrition labeling of Food, Code of Federal Regulations, 21 CFR 101.9,
    Release date April 1, 2010
Baking nuts don't only have to be used for baking! They are as versatile as they are delicious. Add nuts to a variety of meals.
 
Almonds: A symbol of love and happiness
Throughout history, almonds have enjoyed religious and social significance. The early Romans showered newlyweds with almonds as a fertility charm, and almonds were honored as a symbol of good luck for centuries throughout southern Europe. In the Americas, gifts of almonds represent happiness, romance, good health and fortune. Not to mention that foods featuring the light, sophisticated flavor of almonds are universally loved.
Nutty facts!
Almonds, a cholesterol-free food, contain 14 grams of fat per one ounce serving and are a good source of dietary fiber.
An ounce of almonds also gives you 35% of your daily allowance of vitamin E — a valuable antioxidant.
Just one ounce of this little nut is an excellent source of manganese and a good source of other vitamins and minerals like riboflavin, magnesium, phosphorus, and copper.
Most of the fat in almonds is mono-unsaturated, which has been shown to lower blood LDL-cholesterol levels.

REFERENCES:
  • USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 23 (2010), www.ars.usda.gov
  • USFDA/CFSAN/Docket 02P-0505 July 14, 2003
  • Nutrition labeling of Food, Code of Federal Regulations, 21 CFR 101.9,
    Release date April 1, 2010.

 

 
Pecans: A tough nut to crack
Indigenous to the South Central U.S. and Northern Mexico, pecans have been enjoyed for centuries by Native Americans for their delicious taste and nutrition. In fact, the name pecan comes from the Native American word "paccan," meaning a nut with a shell so hard it must be cracked with a stone. Pecans are one of the newest domesticated major crops, with commercial production beginning in the 1880s. Today, consumers enjoy more than 500 varieties of this delicious, flavorful nut, both as a snack and an ingredient in cooking and baking recipes.
Nutty facts!
Pecans are high in fiber - just one ounce provides three grams (11 % DRV). Pecans also contain 20 grams of fat per one ounce serving.
21 vitamins and minerals can be found in the pecan, including a good source of thiamin (vitamin B1), and copper and an excellent source of manganese.

REFERENCES:
  • USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 23 (2010), www.ars.usda.gov
  • USFDA/CFSAN/Docket 02P-0505 July 14, 2003.
  • Nutrition labeling of Food, Code of Federal Regulations, 21 CFR 101.9,
    Release date April 1, 2010.

 

 
Walnuts: The orignal nut
Did you know that walnuts are the oldest-known tree food eaten by man, or that walnuts are the most common nut used in American home-cooked recipes and restaurant dishes? In ancient Persia around 7000 B.C., English merchant ships first started trading walnuts along the Mediterranean Sea. Since walnuts were never commercially produced in England, people believe the name "English walnuts" originated from this historical trading. In the late 1700s, some Franciscan fathers from Mexico and Spain brought walnut trees to California, which now produces 70% of the world's walnuts.

Black walnuts, a popular variety of walnuts, are commonly used for cooking, baking and snacking. Despite a difference in taste, black walnuts and English walnuts have similar nutritional values.
Nutty facts!
An ounce of walnuts contains 2.5 grams of alpha-linolenic acid - the plant based omega-3.
An ounce of walnuts (about 1/4 cup) is an excellent source of copper and manganese and a good source of magnesium and molybdenum.

REFERENCES:
  • USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 23 (2010), www.ars.usda.gov
  • USFDA/CFSAN/Docket 02P-0505 July 14, 2003.
  • Nutrition labeling of Food, Code of Federal Regulations, 21 CFR 101.9,
    Release date April 1, 2010.
  • Walnuts.org

 

 

 
Cashews: Come out of your shell

Even though we refer to the cashew today as a nut, it's actually a seed. Grown at the bottom of a delicate, pear-like fruit, cashew's closest relatives include mangos and pistachios. And even though cashews are cultivated inside an extremely protective, honeycombed shell, they are the only nut marketed exclusively without their shells.

Originally spread from Brazil by Portuguese explorers, international trade of cashews began in the 1920s. Now grown all over the world, one cashew tree can produce approximately 200-300 cashews per year.

Nutty facts!
Roasted cashews contain 4 grams of protein per ounce.
An ounce of roasted cashews contains high levels of copper.
Cashews are also a good source of vitamin K, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, phosphorus and zinc per one ounce serving.

REFERENCES:

  • USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 23 (2010), www.ars.usda.gov
  • Nutrition labeling of Food, Code of Federal Regulations, 21 CFR 101.9,
    Release date April 1, 2010.

 

 
Pine Nuts: A taste of the Mediterranean
A favorite in healthy Mediterranean diets, pine nuts are the hard-to-harvest seed of the umbrella-shaped Stone Pine tree, which has been cultivated for its nuts for over 6,000 years.

This versatile, torpedo-shaped kernel has been used for centuries in a variety of international cuisines, including Mediterranean, Middle Eastern and Asian. In fact, its sweet flavor and delicate crunch continues to be used as the basis of great pestos, breads and pastries, or to add body, texture and flavor to favorite sauces, entrèes and salads.
Nutty facts!
A one ounce serving of pine nuts provides a good source of vitamin E and vitamin K.
The same serving is a good source of the following minerals: copper, magnesium, molybdenum, phosphorus and zinc.
Just one ounce provides over 100% of the DRV for manganese. Manganese is an antioxidant nutrient that is important in the breakdown of amino acids and the production of energy. It is also a catalyst in the breakdown of fats and cholesterol, helps nourish the nerves and brain and is necessary for normal skeletal development. REFERENCES:
  • USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 23 (2010), www.ars.usda.gov
  • Obikoya, George. Manganese – Nutritionally Essential. www.vitamins-nutrition.org.
  • Nutrition labeling of Food, Code of Federal Regulations, 21 CFR 101.9,
    Release date April 1, 2010.

 

 
Hazelnuts: just call me filbert

According to an ancient manuscript found in China, the hazelnut took its place among the five sacred nourishments God bestowed on human beings. In some cultures, hazelnuts were used to create medicines for a variety of ailments – from serious diseases to baldness!

Also known as filberts (since they ripen about the time of St. Philibert Day in late August), hazelnuts are either enjoyed as a delicious snack, a confectionery ingredient or nut topping. Approximately 70% of today's hazelnuts are grown in Turkey, while almost all domestic hazelnuts are grown near Portland, Oregon.

Nutty Facts!
An ounce of hazelnut is an excellent source of copper and manganese, as well as a good source of thiamin (vitamin B1) and magnesium.
Hazelnuts are one of the best natural sources of the antioxidant vitamin E, containing 15 milligrams per 100 grams.
Hazelnuts are a good source of dietary fiber providing three grams per one ounce serving (11% DRV). Hazelnuts also contain 17 grams of fat per serving.

REFERENCES:

  • USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 23 (2010), www.ars.usda.gov
  • USFDA/CFSAN/Docket 02P-0505 July 14, 2003
  • Nutrition labeling of Food, Code of Federal Regulations, 21 CFR 101.9,
    Release date April 1, 2010.

 

 
Sunflower Seeds: Great things come in small package

Native to the Americas, sunflowers were cultivated for their seeds thousands of years ago in present-day Mexico, Arizona and New Mexico. Some archaeologists suggest that the sunflower may have been domesticated before corn. Sunflower seeds were ground into flour for cakes or bread, squeezed for their oil or cracked to eat as a snack.

Nutty Facts!
A one ounce serving of sunflower kernels (approximately two ounces of sunflower seeds) are rich in thiamin (vitamin B1), copper, magnesium, manganese, and selenium.
Additionally the same one ounce serving provides a good source of niacin (vitamin B3), vitamin B6, folic acid, and phosphorus.
An ounce of sunflower seeds provides about 50% of the DRV for vitamin E, a known antioxidant. Vitamin E in IU and % DRV based on RDI in IU.

REFERENCES:

  • USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 23 (2010), www.ars.usda.gov
  • Nutrition labeling of Food, Code of Federal Regulations, 21 CFR 101.9,
    Release date April 1, 2010.

 

 
Macadamias: A taste of down under
While macadamia nuts are often associated with Hawaii, they’re actually native to the rain forests of Queensland, Australia. Macadamia nuts (sometimes called Queensland nuts) are named after botanist John Macadam, who first described the tree’s genus. Though they are grown throughout the world, Australia remains the world’s largest grower of macadamia nuts, producing approximately 40,000 tons of in-shell nuts per year.
Nutty facts!
There are numerous species of macadamia nuts, however only two are edible.
Macadamia nuts have the highest amount of beneficial mono-unsaturated fats of any nut.
A one ounce serving of plain dry roasted macadamia nuts is an excellent source of manganese (45% DRV) and a good source of thiamin (vitamin B1).

REFERENCES:
  • USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 23 (2010), www.ars.usda.gov
  • Nutrition labeling of Food, Code of Federal Regulations, 21 CFR 101.9,
    Release date April 1, 2010.